Posts Tagged ‘jogging’

Runner disaster stories: Wardrobe malfunction

Woman running in a race with two small kidsIf you run long enough, you will do something stupid or encounter some sort of running mishap. In this series, I’ll try to make you feel better about your own mistakes and occasional bouts of misery by sharing others tales of woe! Such as the previous post ‘The unfortunate incident of the improvised gel pouch

Today’s tale comes from Sheila and will remind female runners of the benefits of modern running gear!

The wardrobe malfunction

It was a very hot day and I was getting ready for a 10km race. I was picking out my race outfit. This was in the late 80s before Lululemon and general availability of sports bras. My old cotton bra was more breathable and also had a few holes to let the breezes so it seemed a better idea than the nylon one. I selected shorts and a suitable cotton race T shirt and headed out for the race.

At first, it seemed I had made the right decision. Unfortunately, as I ran, gradually the fastener at the back seemed to be getting looser and looser. The course was 5 km out and 5 km back. Shortly after the turnaround the fastener broke completely. The straps started to slip down my arms, poking out of the shirt sleeves, so I pushed them back up onto my shoulders.  Eventually the chest strap and cups themselves slipped far enough that everything under the shirt was loose and bouncing. The kilometers passed as the shoulder straps and I continued our endless game of slide down the shoulders and push them back up again. With great relief, I spotted the finish line. What better way to ensure I didn’t cross the finish with bra straps around my elbows: I crossed the finish line with my arms triumphantly raised above my head.

Runner crossing finish line with arms up

Who is Sheila?

Well among other things she’s my mom and she was quite the trailblazer in women’s road running. While these days there will often be multiple women competing for the podium in the 60+, 70, and 80+ age groups. When she was running, more than once race organizers had to add an age group because they did not expect any women her age in the race. She qualified for and ran her first Boston marathon the year she turned 65. In her own words:

I started racing when I turned 40, after three years of competitive orienteering convinced me I could run, though not as fast as eldest daughter Judy or my six-foot husband Tim. I have always liked exercise and the outdoors.

One of my favourite running memories is the Boston marathon. The hills did not seem alarming to a woman trained in Fredericton (note from Susan: Fredericton is a river valley and has no shortage of long, steep hills). The cheering students could have been my own (note from Susan: she taught at St Thomas University for over 20 years). Another favorite memory was having almost the whole family running a 10km in Montreal to celebrate my 70th birthday in 2008, finishing in the Olympic Stadium . Alas, Tim’s knee problems meant he could only meet us at the finish.

If you run or jog you may enjoy my other running related posts which include everything from a fun runners quiz, to practical tips, gear reviews, and race reports.

Running on the Road – Seattle

Seattle/Redmond is a regular stop during my travel, and fortunately my running buddy Christopher moved there a few years back and has become my running Sherpa guide for Seattle.

Christopher

I am comfortable running any of these routes alone in daylight, but I would not run any of them alone in the dark. I would only run them early morning or late evening with another runner keeping me company.

Seattle has an amazing trail network and lots of great options in different parts of the city, here is a summary of the trails I explore when in Seattle.

Elliott Bay Trail

Staying in downtown Seattle? Your simplest option is to make your way to the waterfront, turn right and follow the pathway North. You get a nice view of the water for about 4 km (3 miles), although you do have to dodge tourists checking out boat tours and the aquarium for the first km. It can be quite cold in the winter with the wind coming off the water. You can take some nice pictures of the piers to commemorate the run.

  • Location: Downtown Seattle on the waterfront
  • Type: Out and back
  • Hills: None except for running from your hotel down to the waterfront and back.
  • Distance: you can go further in either direction, but my favorite stretch is the 4 km from Ivars Clams to Smith Cove
  • Terrain: Paved pathway
  • Pedestrian/Jogging/Bike traffic: Tourists walking around until you get North of the aquarium, after that mostly joggers and cyclists. There are stretches of the park where they separate the cycling and running paths.

Please note on the map below the markers are km markers NOT mile makers!

Map: elliottBayTrail

Green Lake

This is the busiest running loop I have found in Seattle. It’s a wonderful flat loop around a lake, complete with real washrooms.  You can jog all the way around the lake and look for ducks or rowers. One drawback to this location, Green Lake is notorious for car break ins. Leave absolutely nothing visible in your car when you go out to run. Put everything out of sight in the trunk. Even a pair of sunglasses or a jacket on the front seat can result in returning to a smashed car window. if you are a triathlete you can also do open swims out here as well. Read more about the park facilities at the City of Seattle Green Lake guide.

  • Location: North of downtown near the zoo
  • Type: Loop
  • Hills: None
  • Distance: One loop is about 5 km
  • Terrain: Paved and gravel pathway options
  • Pedestrian/Jogging/Bike traffic: Lots of joggers and walkers a few cyclists.

GreenLake

Alki

  • Location: West Seattle
  • Type: Out and back
  • Hills: None
  • Distance: End to End about 12 km
  • Terrain: Paved pathway + one stretch on city streets connecting Alki beach to Lincoln park.
  • Pedestrian/Jogging/Bike traffic: If you go on a sunny weekend there will be a LOT of pedestrians, rollerbladers, and cyclists near the beach.

alkiviewThis is probably my favorite running trail because you jog along the water, my favorite stretch is down around Lincoln Park as you run past the beaches and driftwood, though the views of the Seattle Skyline as your round the northern point are a treat as well.  If you are looking for a decadent treat, consider stopping at Top Pot donuts at the South end of Alki beach or grab breakfast at Luna Park café right by the West Seattle bridge. The only parking around here is street parking. As a general guideline, the further away from Alki beach you are, the easier it is to find parking.

Please note on the map below the markers are km markers NOT mile makers!

Alki

Burke Gilman Trail

I know I have run on various stretches of the Burke Gilman trail, but it’s always been with other runners leading the way. This is the trail that seems to go on forever! It takes you from the Lake Union loop all the way out to the Sammamish trail.  The stretch I remember is near the university of Washington, a pleasant shaded stretch. You can find more information on the city site about the Burke Gilman trail

  • Location: From Shilshole Bay to Bothell!
  • Type: Out and back or connect to the lake union loop
  • Hills: I have not done the entire trail so I don’t know
  • Distance: End to End about 18 miles
  • Terrain: Paved pathway
  • Pedestrian/Jogging/Bike traffic: lots of cyclists because this is a popular commuting trail, so if you are jogging with friends stay to one side of the path and be careful when passing

Please note on the map below the markers are km markers NOT mile makers!

BurkeGillman

Sammamish River Trail

This is another of those incredibly long trails, it goes from Bothell through Woodinville to Redmond. It connects the Burke Gilman trail to Marymoor. The stretches I have run were all flat along the river.  Keep your eyes open for herons and ducks along the river and you can get in as much mileage as you need. I have started from Redmond to do an out and back, and I have started from Woodinville to do an out and back. My favorite stretch is to go North on this trail starting at the Commons (145th St). You pass bathrooms and a water fountain about 3 km up the trail which is convenient. You can find out more information on the city site for the Sammamish River Trail.

  • Location: Bothell, Woodinville, Redmond
  • Type: Out and back
  • Hills: None that I have encountered, but I have not done the entire trail
  • Distance: as far as you want to go if you connect to the Burke Gilman or Marymoor
  • Terrain: Paved pathway
  • Pedestrian/Jogging/Bike traffic: You will meet a few cyclists, a few pedestrians and a few joggers, possibly a horse or two on some stretches.

SammamishRiverTrail

Marymoor park

MarymoorviewMarymoor park is a popular park for many activities with a trail running through it. On a clear day you can see Mt Rainier in the distance. Depending when you go you might run past people flying remote control planes.  I take personal pleasure crossing a small bridge at the end of the park which has a speed limit of 6 mph. It’s not often I can speed when jogging 😊.  If you drive out here for a morning run, the family pancake house makes a good spot for breakfast post run.  

The other great thing about Marymoor park is it connects to several other much longer trails so you can easily add  mileage as needed. You can connect to the East Lake Sammamish trail or the Sammamish river trail. Find out more about the park at the Marymoor park site. To find out more information about the trail, the city has a site on the Marymoor Connector trail

  • Location: Redmond
  • Type: Out and back
  • Hills: None
  • Distance: as far as you want to go if you connect to the East lake Sammamish or Sammamish River Trails
  • Terrain: Paved pathway
  • Pedestrian/Jogging/Bike traffic: You will meet a few cyclists, a few pedestrians and a few joggers, some of the cyclists are commuters and may be moving fast.

Please note on the map below the markers are km markers NOT mile makers!

marymoor

520 Trail

The 520 trail is mostly used by commuters, but it does work as a running trail if you are staying near or working at the Microsoft campus in Redmond.  It’s a noisy trail because it runs parallel to the 520. If you are running at dusk make sure you are reflective and visible to cyclists who are often going pretty fast! If it’s summer and you are lucky you might be able to take advantage of all the blackberries growing on the side of the path. The trail follows the 520 from just East of the 405 to Redmond.  I have only done the 4 km stretch from Microsoft to Redmond which includes a wicked hill!  If you need hill training, this will do the trick.  There are of course lots of other hills in Seattle you can run, but this one happens to be convenient to wear I usually work and is on a path.

  • Location: Redmond
  • Type: Out and back
  • Hills: hilly with one really solid climb about a mile long
  • Distance: About 8 km if you start at one end of Microsoft campus and go to Redmond and back. You can go as far as you want to go if you connect to the Sammamish River Trail
  • Terrain: Paved pathway
  • Pedestrian/Jogging/Bike traffic: Mostly cyclists commuting to and from work

520Trail

East Lake Sammamish Trail

If you are near Redmond, and just want a nice trail with views of the water, I recommend the East Lake Sammamish trail.  We made the mistake of driving further down and planning to run back and discovered just about every road there does not allow street parking. So if you don’t want to start your run at Marymoor, make sure you check out the map below or visit the city website  with more details on the East Lake Sammamish Trail so you know where you can park.

  • Location: Redmond
  • Type: Out and back
  • Hills: Flat
  • Distance: About 8 km if you start at one end of Microsoft campus and go to Redmond and back. You can go as far as you want to go if you connect to the Sammamish River Trail
  • Terrain: Paved pathway/gravel pathway
  • Pedestrian/Jogging/Bike traffic: fairly quiet, the occasional cyclist or jogger

eastlakeSammamish

Seattle Green Lake Running Group

I would be remiss if I did not call out this running group. There are more running trails and loops I have never explored. Seattle has a fantastic trail network.  If you are new to Seattle, or visiting Seattle and are looking for someone to run with so you can learn some good routes, I have found the Seattle Green Lake Running Group to be very welcoming. Whenever I am in town for a weekend and need a long run, I run with the group. They have a Facebook page, but they use a Meetup to plan the long runs many of which include great photo ops like this one from Kerry Park, famous for it’s views of Seattle.

greenLakerunners

If you have a specific distance and pace in mind it’s a good idea to post it to the meetup, chances are someone will help you out. They usually run at 7 AM Saturday mornings for the long runs. It’s also quite common for runners with longer distances to do 6 @6 a couple of loops around Green lake before the other runners arrive and then finish your last 6,8,10, 12, 14 miles with the larger group.  You can also post to the meetup that you would like to do a 6@6 and are looking for company.  There will be distances written in chalk on the parking lot so you can find the other runners doing your distance. You will have to ask around and introduce yourself to find out who else is running around your pace and who knows the route 🙂 Since I am not a local, I rely on someone else to make sure I don’t get lost.

They do other runs as well, track workouts, evening runs, mid-week runs.  The only runs I have done with them are the Saturday morning long runs and the Monday track workouts.  But they have definitely been a huge help for keeping me on track with my long runs when on the road in Seattle!  Whether you want to run 3 miles or 18 miles, whether you are running 10 minute miles or 7 minute miles you will find a kindred spirit.

Thank you SGRLG! You rock!

For more running related blog posts check out my page for runners.

Running on the road – Singapore

I travel for work, and it can be challenging but rewarding getting in a run in a new city! In this post I share the running routes I discovered in Singapore.20180518_101645

Where to stay for easy access to running routes

I recommend staying in the colonial quarter, there are lots of hotels in the area. I stayed at the JW Marriott.  The neighborhood gives you easy access to two different 5 km loops from your front door and the waterfront has some good paths.

If you are staying further out, these routes can be run from MRT Esplanade.

What time of day to run

Singapore-mapBecause Singapore is so close to the equator sunrise and sunset will be around the same time every day no matter what time of year. Expect dawn at about 7 AM and dusk to move in around 7 PM. The weather will be hot and humid no matter what time of day you run.  Expect a high between 80F/26C and 90F/33C but the humidity will make it feel more like 88F/31C to 99F/37C. If you get out at 7 AM you might get a nice cool 70F/21C with 90% humidity. You definitely want to bring water on your run! There is also a good chance you will get caught in rain or a thundershower.

Marina Bay loop

20180523_075453Distance:  5-6 km depending on the route you take through the gardens.
Path type: mix of city sidewalk, waterfront walk, and paths through botanical gardens.

Safety: These are very well travelled and touristy paths, you will meet other runners and tourists taking photos.
TIP: If you have to cross Esplanade and Raffles Avenue/Stamford Avenue there is an underground pathway you can use to cross the street.
Sights/photo ops: The Merlion, Marina Bay Sands Hotel, Singapore Flyer, and the SuperTrees at Gardens by the Bay
Wildlife: An assortment of local birds, squirrels, and if you are very lucky you might spot an otter on the waterfront near Marina Bay Gardens
Hills: None
Bathrooms: There are public bathrooms at various spots in the Marina May Gardens

Directions

MarinaBayRouteHead South from the Colonial District towards the Singapore River until you reach the path along the river. Turn left (East) towards the Marina Sands Hotel. When you reach Esplanade Drive/Collyer Quay turn right and follow it around Marina Bay. You will pass the Merlion statue with great views of the Singapore Flyer and Marina Bay Sands Hotel. Turn left on Marina Boulevard when you get to the end of the Marina. If you continue around Marina Bay it’s about a 3 km loop. If you stay on Marina Boulevard a little further it will take you to the Gardens by The Bay. A park made up of three waterfront gardens. Pick a path to enter the park and then look for signs to the Supertree Grove, definitely worth checking out. Then follow the signs to the Cloud Forest and Flower Done. The Cloud forest and Flower Done are the big glass buildings you probably saw in the distance, and behind them is a road you can follow back towards Marina Bay Sands. When you reach Marina Bay Sands you will find a funky pedestrian bridge shaded by sliver sails you can use to cross the Singapore River. Turn left on Marina Boulevard back until you hit the right cross road to take you back to your starting point.

Singapore Flyer Loop

20180521_075855Distance: 5-6 km depending on the side paths you follow
Path type: sidewalk and riverfront path
Sights/Photo Ops: Singapore Flyer, FI Pit Stop, and both mornings I ran this route I saw dragon boaters out practicing near Nicholls Highway.
Wildlife: The occasional bird and squirrel.

Safety: I was a female running alone and I felt perfectly safe, there were lots of other runners around. The only exception was the sidewalk along Nicholls highway, it’s a little off the beaten tourist track, but I still felt safe. I did not run this route in the dark.
Hills: None
Bathrooms: There is a public bathroom on the riverfront path about 1 km north of the F1 Pit stop

Directions

SingaproeFlyerRouteHead south from the Colonial District until you reach the Singapore River and turn left(East) along the promenade. Follow the river East staying on the North side of the Singapore River. to the riverfront path. The path leads you past the Singapore flyer and some great views of the Marina Gardens and Singapore skyline. Follow the path a little further and you pass the F1 Pit stop building on your left. You have a pleasant 2 km or so along the waterfront and eventually you reach the bridge. To get back to SunTec city you go under the bridge and turn left, there is a path that takes you to a sidewalk that runs parallel to Nicholl Highway which runs right back to SunTec City

Need a longer run?

Combine the two loops, or add an out and back along the waterfont path.  The waterfront path continues north at Nicholls Highway and it continues East at Marina Bay. I was unable to find a pedestrian friendly way to cross the river and reach East park which is another popular jogging path.

Here the rest of my running related posts and race reports.